Deadheading Digs…

“Deadheading Digs” is a new feature, intended to publicise any recent releases that have proved themselves to be ear worms and deserve to be heard by you, the clamouring, music-hungry masses.

“Red” – More than Conquerors

Belfast-based quartet, the almighty More Than Conquerors, are back. The rhythm-driven, yet almost elegiac “Red” is their first release of 2015, and is evocative of Fugazi, but with greater lyricism and slicker production. They are currently touring the UK, and I strongly advise that you check them out before they take off (they are due to appear at SXSW in Texas later this year).

“Manchester Post” – Rainy Boy Sleep

Flying the flag for folktronica is Rainy Boy Sleep. “Manchester Post” is the first single from his forthcoming album, “Waiting Games” (which is his debut, and will be released with Universal Music, no less), and it is nothing short of smashing. Pleasantly melodic, but with biting, acerbic shreds of wit interspersed throughout, his flawless writing and delivery is matched only by Reuben Keeney’s sharp production.

“Sirens” – Silent Noise Parade

Stalwarts of consistently innovative, alternative electronic, Silent Noise Parade have just released the brilliant “Sirens”. Minimalist, emotive, and something of a slow-burner, this is an incredibly rewarding track (think Brian Eno by way of Irish post-punk) that is bound to keep you hitting the replay button.

“Peanut Butter” – Krill

Hailing from Boston, Massachusetts, Krill are a trio that create exceedingly great, pseudo-psych, guitar-based rock, and are leaving a slew of equally eccentric sounds and URLs in their wake (for instance, see their Bandcamp and Twitter links). “Peanut Butter” is catchy, diverse, tinged with dark, garage-rock undertones, and is further evidence, if any were needed, of their being destined for big things. They’re are about to release their third album, the much anticipated “A Distant Fist Unclenching”, and are currently touring Europe.

(I’d also like to take this opportunity to apologise to frontman/bassist Jonah Furman, in case any offence was caused by a tweet of mine. Your vocals on this track are, to me, evocative of Kim Gordon, and that is intended as a compliment.)

Advertisements

Exclusive: New Tracks from Moscow Metro, “Late Night Radio” and “Berlin Prayer”

Exclusive to Deadheading: stream Moscow Metro’s brand new tracks!

After months of anticipation, Limerick’s almighty Moscow Metro are finally releasing the follow-up to their highly acclaimed debut, “Spirit of a City”. The two new tracks, “Late Night Radio” and “Berlin Prayer” are part of an upcoming series of releases: the band is planning to release a string of new singles as quickly as they can record them.

Produced by Owen Geaney (of Silent Noise Parade), these are also the first songs that Moscow Metro have released as a trio, and feature Sean Corcoran on lead vocals, guitar and bass following the departure of frontman Barry McNulty, who’s baritone vocals received much praise: Dylan Casey (drums/percussion) and Alan Holmes (synths) remain as before.

“Late Night Radio” is by no means what I had anticipated, but in a truly great way. It is filled with more hooks than a well-stocked fishing boat, but in no way compromises the band’s trademark “joyous in the face of nihilism” sound (if you have yet to be acquainted with Moscow Metro’s music, you’ll know what I mean upon listening). It’s a brilliant mesh of hard-hitting, vibrant rhythms, and bursts of sharp melody; the reverberating guitar licks don’t just cascade, they expand right across the night sky conjured by the rhythm section’s brooding, pulsating cadence.

This is bound to be a sure-fire hit in terms of radio play, and not just because of its apt title. Here is a band that obviously recognises the levity of matters like social isolation which is in correlation, if not causation, with the inherent bleakness of industrial cityscapes, and chooses to integrate said matters into a catchy, dance-influenced track. Corcoran’s vocals are not entirely dissimilar to McNulty’s, despite their being more frenetic than expressive, and they blend well with the general tonality.

Late Night Radio Itunes

Inspired by the band’s experiences after playing a string of well-received German shows on their first international tour, “Berlin Prayer” is something of a departure from their usual sound. Whilst the hallmarks of post-punk are still very much present, particularly in the bright, melodic guitar tracks, which layer until they build a veritable wall of noise, the lyrics’ melancholic gaze has shifted slightly from the usual manners of introspection. There is a vibrant vitality to be found in the notably slower pace, with Holmes and Casey providing a restrained, atmospheric rhythmic undercurrent, which rapidly rises to dizzyingly high, crashing waves of furious sound come the song’s crescendo.

Berlin PrayerItunes

Thankfully, Moscow Metro have successfully managed to avoid the dreaded “Second Release Syndrome” (sidenote: this is when a hotly-tipped band begins to feel the heat, and releases something purely for the sake of satisfying the increasingly rabid fans that their first release won them), and in doing so, have meticulously crafted two more wonderful songs that showcase their diverse abilities as both musicians and writers, and are well-worth raving about (I’d make the seemingly inevitable allusion to their being a worthy successor to a certain group that were famed for indulging in Unknown Pleasures, but this is a band that will surely go on to transcend comparison and genre boundaries alike, and deserve much better than being lazily dubbed “post-punk revivalists” for the umpteenth time).

And so, I not only stand by, but am happy to reaffirm all of the praise that I have ever had for Moscow Metro: make no qualms about it, when a band is able to consistently deliver such high quality output at such an early stage, you’d have to be a fool not to sit up and listen.

 

Artwork by Shane Connaughton

You can check out the video for “Late Night Radio” below.